CISSP PRACTICE QUESTIONS – 20191003

Effective CISSP Questions

Your company decides to start the business of selling toys online and shipping globally. The E-Commerce system that supports the new business will be developed in-house.  The client is executed in modern web browsers. The development team is evaluating the single sign-on (SSO) solution. Which of the following least likely meets the requirement of SSO?
A. OAuth
B. OIDC (OpenId Connect)
C. SAML (Security Assertion Markup Language)
D. XACML (eXtensible Access Control Markup Language)

Kindly be reminded that the suggested answer is for your reference only. It doesn’t matter whether you have the right or wrong answer. What really matters is your reasoning process and justifications.

My suggested answer is D. XACML (eXtensible Access Control Markup Language).

xacml_architecture_26_flow

Pseudo-Authentication using OAuth

OAuth is an open standard for access delegation, commonly used as a way for Internet users to grant websites or applications access to their information on other websites but without giving them the passwords.[1] This mechanism is used by companies such as Amazon,[2] Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Twitter to permit the users to share information about their accounts with third party applications or websites.

OAuth is an authorization protocol, rather than an authentication protocol. Using OAuth on its own as an authentication method may be referred to as pseudo-authentication.

Source: Wikipeida

OIDC (OpenId Connect)

OpenID Connect is a simple identity layer on top of the OAuth 2.0 protocol, which allows computing clients to verify the identity of an end-user based on the authentication performed by an authorization server, as well as to obtain basic profile information about the end-user in an interoperable and REST-like manner. In technical terms, OpenID Connect specifies a RESTful HTTP API, using JSON as a data format.

OpenID Connect allows a range of clients, including Web-based, mobile, and JavaScript clients, to request and receive information about authenticated sessions and end-users. The specification suite is extensible, supporting optional features such as encryption of identity data, discovery of OpenID Providers, and session management.[1]

Source: Wikipedia

SAML (Security Assertion Markup Language)

Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML, pronounced SAM-el[1]) is an open standard for exchanging authentication and authorization data between parties, in particular, between an identity provider and a service provider. SAML is an XML-based markup language for security assertions (statements that service providers use to make access-control decisions).

The single most important use case that SAML addresses is web browser single sign-on (SSO). Single sign-on is relatively easy to accomplish within a security domain (using cookies, for example) but extending SSO across security domains is more difficult and resulted in the proliferation of non-interoperable proprietary technologies. The SAML Web Browser SSO profile was specified and standardized to promote interoperability.[2] (For comparison, the more recent OpenID Connect protocol[3] is an alternative approach to web browser SSO.)

Source: Wikipedia

XACML (eXtensible Access Control Markup Language)

XACML stands for “eXtensible Access Control Markup Language”. The standard defines a declarative fine-grained, attribute-based access control policy language,[2] an architecture, and a processing model describing how to evaluate access requests according to the rules defined in policies.

As a published standard specification, one of the goals of XACML is to promote common terminology and interoperability between access control implementations by multiple vendors. XACML is primarily an attribute-based access control system (ABAC), where attributes (bits of data) associated with a user or action or resource are inputs into the decision of whether a given user may access a given resource in a particular way. Role-based access control (RBAC) can also be implemented in XACML as a specialization of ABAC.

Source: Wikipedia

Summary

  • XACML is all about authorization.
  • OAuth can authenticate users through pseudo-authentication (not a good practice) and SSO is achievable.
  • SAML and OIDC are designed to achieve SSO.

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